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Past Exhibitions


Imprint

March 18-April 8, 2022

Artists: Max Trumpower & Sierra Schweitzer

Medium: Various

[imprint]

Artist Statement

The body is a vessel that ingrains certain experiences into its everyday functioning. The body not only withstands physical trauma, but can also project emotional trauma onto its wearers. Our work expands on these experiences with the body and the unpredictability that can occur in response. Our work explores the intimate relationships that we often have with our bodies, and the problems that may occur due to its dysfunction. Although each artist focuses on different contributors to their pains, they relate in the way that their bodies remember a lifetime of these traumatic experiences and remain permanently changed because of it. 

Sierra Schweitzer’s newest work explores the relationship between body and surface, finding a way to interweave the complexities of pain within the entirety of a piece. This work is influenced by her newly developed relationship with chronic illness and simultaneously developing relationship with ceramics. This concentration on sculptural ceramics has become a direct cause and effect of her new experiences with pain. In the process of making, clay has become an artistic practice of patience. Clay as a material requires patience through the entire process of building, firing, and surfacing. This is why Schweitzer's new work has become almost entirely ceramics and finding new ways of including other mediums atop of or embedded in clay. Similar to sculpture, her photographic work is even more personal as it captures the reality of how pain and exhaustion disrupt a sense of joy in everyday life.

Max Trumpower’s work specifically focuses on their relationship to their body and gender based on their Hispanic Catholic upbringing. Trumpower’s work focuses on twisting religious icononography into queer narratives through ceramics. As a medium, the plasticity of ceramics lends itself to how Trumpower views their relationship with gender. They explore gender roles within the church through a cultural lens that reflects on their own childhood experiences with religion. These narratives are displayed through their paintings on handbuilt altar vessels, as well as through figurative work. Trumpower also looks to reexamine the fear that they felt of authority figures within the church, and how this mirrored the fear they felt of authority figures within their own home life. Their work is not only a reflection of their PTSD from childhood, but a reflection of what many children fear: wrath.

Artist Bios

Max Trumpower is an artist from Charlotte, North Carolina. Trumpower currently lives and works in Boone, North Carolina at Appalachian State University. They are a candidate for their BFA in Studio Art with a concentration in painting, and a secondary concentration in ceramics as they plan to graduate in May 2022. Trumpower utilizes a combination of sgraffito, oil painting, and other drawing methods within their work. Trumpower focuses on figurative work within their ceramics, completing these works with layers of oil paint. They are also interested in implementing found materials within their ceramics, and they experiment with different types of metals and building methods. Their current work focuses on the intersection between their Catholic upbringing and their queer identity. Trumpower has also received the Jody and Peter Petschauer scholarship, where they were fully funded to attend a summer workshop at the Penland School of Crafts. Max has participating in several group showings at the Nth Gallery located in Boone, NC in 2021. They had also been an intern this past summer at the Reynolda House Museum of American Art, where they were also a guest speaker leading a presentation about the queer atists that were included within Reynold’s collection. After they graduate, they hope to attend a post-baccalaureate program and receive an MFA in ceramics in the near future.

Sierra Schweitzer is a multidisciplinary artist whose work primarily focuses on sculpture and photography. Currently a senior at Appalachian State University and pursuing a degree in Studio Art, Schweitzer’s proficiency within multiple mediums has allowed for her newest work to explore the relationship between body and surface, finding a way to interweave the complexities of pain within the entirety of a piece. Much of her newest work is influenced by her newly developed relationship with chronic illness and simultaneously developing relationship with ceramics. This concentration on sculptural ceramics has become a direct cause and effect of her new experiences with pain, and has formed into her new artistic practice of patience. Clay as a material requires patience through the entire process of building, firing, and surfacing, which is why Schweitzer's new work has become almost entirely ceramics and finding new ways of including other mediums atop of or embedded in clay. Schweitzer has received multiple awards in the past few years including the Petschauer scholarship to attend a workshop at Penland School of Craft, and the Peggy Polson tuition scholarship which included $3,000 toward her university tuition in 2020-21. She was also awarded the Sherry Edwards Scholarship for Art in 2020, which is a tuition award for students concentrating in sculpture. Since then she has been focusing on personal projects and artist collaborations with local artists such as Lisa Stinson. 


The Weight of the World

February 11-March 4

Artist: Abe Krell

Medium: Digital Print

Bio: Abe Krell is a senior at AppState studying Geographic Information Systems and Community and Regional Planning. He is a member of the Chancellor's Scholars Program and the president of the Appalachian Geographical Society. Other than his artwork, he enjoys reading, running, seeing live music, and collecting music memorbilia.

 


Women Holding Up The World

January 10-February 11, 2022

Artist: Dr. Elaine J. O'Quinn

Medium: Collage/Mixed Media

Bio: Dr. O’Quinn has been a professor of English at ASU for 22 years. In her classes she consistently integrates the visual arts. When studying poetic form, students create their own paintings to go with the haiku and cinquain verses they compose. These are then complied into classroom community “quilts” that tell others something about what each student values in life. Students also make biographical collages that accompany narratives about their lives, and they are often asked to use art to depict characters, moods, emotions, and scenes. Pre-service English teachers are required to explore and create potential visual aids that might be used to support the teaching of texts. This may be anything from a mask for the ballroom scene in Romeo and Juliet to illustrating a passage from a text to creating a graphic depiction of a story to caricatures of characters. In her own work, Dr. O’Quinn works in several different mediums. She has won prizes for her alcohol ink paintings and done several gallery shows, created an array of visual art journals from collage, made greeting cards from both alcohol ink and collage, produced a line of jewelry that consists of rings, earrings and necklaces, dabbled in mixed media pictures, and uses both ink and other materials to create one-of-a-kind ornaments. This is her first attempt at a series of mixed media collages with a common theme.

OQuinn Exhibit Poster  OQuinn2 Jan 2022